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our mission is to raise awareness on issues impacting healthcare policy, build
consensus through dialogue, and shape recommendations for future policies

Report-14/12/2014
The silent pandemic: Tackling hepatitis C with policy innovation

Governments across the world will have to face up to the challenges posed by the hepatitis C (HCV) pandemic or experience spiralling healthcare costs, says the Economist Intelligence Unit in its report The silent pandemic: Tackling hepatitis C with policy innovation.

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Report-01/07/2014
New EU standards in hepatitis C care

A new report, “Hepatitis C: Setting Standards in a Journey towards the Eradication of Infection and Disease as a Serious Health Issue in the EU”, proposes new standards in Hepatitis C care for consideration by all involved in developing policies to address Hepatitis C across the European Union (EU).

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Report-05/06/2014
Towards an integrated policy approach

Tackling hepatitis C: moving towards an integrated policy approach is an Economist Intelligence Unit report, supported by Janssen, which investigates national and multinational policy initiatives to combat the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The report reveals that many countries around the world have been slow to respond with national policies on hepatitis C despite recent government pledges to fight the disease, and concludes that improvements need to be made in terms of disease surveillance, prevention, and outreach.

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Report-31/05/2014
Combating Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a serious public health issue around the world and is considered a ‘viral time bomb’ by the World Health Organization due to its high prevalence, long term unpredictable disease progression, aging population, and low diagnosis and treatment rates. Approximately 150 million people globally are living with HCV, however many are unaware of their infection. An FT special report, published on 28 July 2014, gives a global overview of recent medical advances and new treatments and the access challenges for public health worldwide.

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The silent pandemic: Tackling hepatitis C with policy innovation

Report by the Economist Intelligence Unit supported by Janssen

Governments across the world will have to face up to the challenges posed by the hepatitis C (HCV) pandemic or experience spiralling healthcare costs, says the Economist Intelligence Unit in its report The silent pandemic: Tackling hepatitis C with policy innovation.

The report, made possible as a result of an educational grant from Janssen, challenges countries to use co-ordinated strategies to tackle HCV but warns that this will not be easy because few countries understand the magnitude of the disease. The report finds that in the European Union, only the Netherlands has the kind of epidemiological data robust enough to inform policy.

What the report highlights is that because levels of awareness are so low, many people only receive an HCV diagnosis when diagnosed with its end-stage conditions such as cirrhosis or liver cancer. Poor healthcare practices, such as failing to screen donated blood and the use of unsterilised medical equipment, are the cause of millions of cases in the developing world.

The report concludes that countries need to improve the data they have in order to introduce a comprehensive approach to tackling HCV. This will include raising awareness about the disease, taking preventative measures, especially within health services, and making a real effort to reach vulnerable patient groups with available treatments treatments before end-stage conditions develop.

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 Tackling hepatitis C with policy innovation

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 Tackling hepatitis C with policy innovation

 

Tackling hepatitis C: moving towards an integrated policy approach

Tackling hepatitis C: moving towards an integrated policy approach is an Economist Intelligence Unit report, supported by Janssen, which investigates national and multinational policy initiatives to combat the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The report reveals that many countries around the world have been slow to respond with national policies on hepatitis C despite recent government pledges to fight the disease, and concludes that improvements need to be made in terms of disease surveillance, prevention, and outreach.

Download the report


Download infographic

 

 

FT Health Combating Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a serious public health issue around the world and is considered a ‘viral time bomb’ by the World Health Organization due to its high prevalence, long term unpredictable disease progression, aging population, and low diagnosis and treatment rates. Approximately 150 million people globally are living with HCV, however many are unaware of their infection. An FT special report, published on 28 July 2014, gives a global overview of recent medical advances and new treatments and the access challenges for public health worldwide.

Download the FT Health Supplement Combating Hepatitis C .

“This document is not authored by Janssen, and was made possible through an unconditional sponsorship from Janssen whereby the authors had full editorial input and control. This document reflects the opinions and views of the authors, and are not necessarily those of Janssen.”

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Proposal for new EU standards in hepatitis C care

A new report, “Hepatitis C: Setting Standards in a Journey towards the Eradication of Infection and Disease as a Serious Health Issue in the EU”, proposes new standards in Hepatitis C care for consideration by all involved in developing policies to address Hepatitis C across the European Union (EU).

The report – commissioned by Janssen Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA) and MSD - offers a holistic approach for the improvement and delivery of effective and quality care for Hepatitis C in Europe. The principle recommendations cut across prevention, diagnosis, treatment/care, monitoring/surveillance and planning/coordination, helping to guide European governments to set best practice standards of care that will have a real impact.

The report is both timely and pressing, given the urgent need for countries to tackle head-on the growing social and economic impact of Hepatitis C as outlined in the Economist Intelligence Unit report, ‘The silent pandemic: Tackling hepatitis C with policy innovation’.

Professor David Goldberg, co-author of the report and widely-recognized for his role in the successful Scottish National Hepatitis C Action Plan, underlines that serious progress in improving HCV services could ultimately lead to the eradication of HCV infection and disease within the EU.

The new report “Hepatitis C: Setting Standards in a Journey towards the Eradication of Infection and Disease as a Serious Health Issue in the EU” can be downloaded from the European Liver Patients Association and from the World Hepatitis Alliance website

 

The Uncomfortable Truth

Hepatitis C in England: The State of the Nation

A new report, published by The Hepatitis C Trust, has found that hepatitis C is under-prioritised in England.

The report aims to shine a light on this overlooked condition and the reality of care for the thousands of people with hepatitis C.

The report also provides recommendations for the eradication of the disease in England including prioritisation of hepatitis C by Public Health England and local authorities, greater public awareness, and the development of local referral pathways and support mechanisms to ensure people are referred to specialist care.

The Hepatitis C Trust is a UK-wide charity focused on hepatitis C. The publication of this report was supported by Janssen and MSD.

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Related News


FT Health Combating Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C virus has become a serious public health issue around the world and is considered a ‘viral time bomb’ by the World Health Organisation due to its high prevalence, long term unpredictable disease progression, aging population, and low diagnosis and treatment rates.

30/12/2013 Find out more

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